Nutrition

What is Nutriton in regards to Heart Health

Heart disease accounts for nearly one-third of all deaths worldwide

Diet plays a major role in heart health and can impact your risk of heart disease.

In fact, certain foods can influence blood pressure, triglycerides, cholesterol levels and inflammation, all of which are risk factors for heart disease.

Victoria Middleton

Victoria Middleton

RD
Registered Dietitian
New York City, NY
Yumna Khan

Yumna Khan

RD
Registered Dietitian
Burlington, ON
Margarita deGraaf

Margarita deGraaf

RD
Registered Dietitian
Burlington, ON

Diana Steele, BSc, RD, discusses How to Reduce Sodium in Your Diet

Quiz: Do You Understand Nutrition?

Test your knowledge by answering the following questions:

Questions
True
False
1

Up to 50% of premature heart disease and stroke can be prevented through your lifestyle habits.

Explanation:
Up to 80% of premature heart disease and stroke can be prevented through your lifestyle habits.
2

A diet low in saturated fat and high in fibre and plant food can reduce your risk of developing heart disease by improving your cholesterol and blood pressure levels, controlling your blood sugar and helping you maintain a healthy body weight.

Explanation:
A diet low in saturated fat and high in fibre and plant food is helpful in controlling blood sugar levels.
3

You should aim for 6 servings of fruits and vegetables per day.

Explanation:
Aim for 7-10 servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Fruits and vegetables are rich in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fibre.
4

You should aim to eat less than 3,000 milligrams of sodium daily.

Explanation:
If you have congestive heart failure, fluid retention is one of the biggest issues you face. You should aim to eat less than 2,000 milligrams of sodium daily.
5

You should avoid foods with partially hydrogenated oils.

Explanation:
Look for foods that contain unsaturated fat rather than saturated fat. Lower your trans fatty acid intake by avoiding foods with hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils, shortening and margarine.
(Answer all questions to activate)

Dr. Milan Gupta, MD, FRCPC, Cardiologist, discusses How to Control LDL or ‘Bad’ Cholesterol in Your Life

Diana Steele, BSc, RD, discusses how to reduce saturated fats.

Diana Steele, BSc, RD, discusses the dangers of high tryglerides.

How to Reduce Sodium in Your Diet

If you have high blood pressure or you’re trying to reduce your sodium intake there are several choices you can make to reduce your sodium intake.

The average Canadian is consuming way more sodium than they should be, and a low sodium diet contains only 1500 milligrams, and that’s quite difficult to achieve through diet.

One of the things you can start with is to cook from scratch more often. Rather than choosing rices and pastas that have sauces already on them, cook them from scratch at home.

Try to choose more fresh or frozen items such as fresh fruits and vegetables rather than tinned vegetables and fruit. And if you choose to have tinned beans make sure you’re rinsing off the extra sodium.

For snack foods, try to avoid salted nuts and chips and choose air-popped popcorn instead. And finally, when you’re eating out, ask for less salt and be sure not to use the salt at the table.

For more information on how to lower your sodium intake, contact your local registered dietitian.

Presenter: Ms. Diana Steele, Registered Dietitian, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Registered Dietitian

How to Reduce Saturated Fats

If you’ve been diagnosed with high LDL cholesterol or you’re just trying to make some heart healthy choices, there are several things you can do with your diet, in particular, lowering your dietary saturated fat.

To do that you should try to aim for lower fat animal products. This will help lower your saturated fat. Choose extra lean ground beef, take off the skin from your chicken and choose meats that are less marbled.

You can also add more fish and nuts and seeds as well as choosing vegetarian meals such as beans, and lentils and chickpeas. And try to get rid of some of those high fat deli meats such as bacon, sausages and salami.

You can also reduce your choice of high fat creamy sauces and choose more tomato sauces instead. And finally, limit your egg yolks. If you can limit egg yolks to only two per week, you’ll lower your saturated fat intake and your cholesterol.

If you’d like more information on how you can lower your saturated fat intake, you can contact your local registered dietitian.

Presenter: Ms. Diana Steele, Registered Dietitian, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Registered Dietitian

High Triglycerides and Diet

If you have high triglycerides, or you’re trying to lower your LDL cholesterol, you can increase your intake of omega 3 fats.

Omega 3 fats are found in fatty fish. This would be salmon, halibut, tuna, trout, mackerel, sardines, and herring.

You can also increase your intake of nuts and seeds, and in particular, pumpkin seeds and walnuts, as well as flax seeds, and of course adding in more vegetable oils and trying to cook with liquid oils instead of solid fats can increase your omega 3s. Try more olive oil, canola oil, grape seed oil, as well as some nut oils like walnut oil.

If you’d like to find out more about how to increase your omega 3 fatty acid intake, contact your local registered dietitian.

Presenter: Ms. Diana Steele, Registered Dietitian, Vancouver, BC

Local Practitioners: Registered Dietitian

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